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Samson Airline 77 Guitar Bug System (Gibson Jack AG1/CR77)

Product Code SASW7AVSGGK-E1
Manufacturer Samson

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Description

The AirLine 77 UHF Guitar System offers a true wireless experience with no beltpacks or cables, allowing total freedom of mobility. The system includes either a Gibson® (AG1) or a Fender® (AF1) style transmitter that plugs into your guitar or bass, along with the CR77 receiver.

AG1 and AF1 AirLine Guitar transmitters plug directly into the jack of the guitar with no cables running to a pack. The AG1 is a 90-degree plug suitable for most popular straight angle jacks while the AF1 plugs in at a 45-degree angle for body mounted recessed jacks. Both offer complete wireless freedom with no beltpacks and solid UHF performance.

All of the AirLine transmitters operate on inexpensive and lightweight AAA batteries that offer 14 hours of operation on a single battery.

The core of the receiver system is the CR77 true-diversity half-rack UHF receiver. It works flawlessly with all AirLine UHF transmitters. Featuring a front panel display with large multi-segment audio level and RF level LED meters, and a large rotary volume knob that allows easy adjustment of audio output, the CR77 takes all of the guesswork out making your wireless system perform.

Its synthesized PLL frequency control circuitry keeps the signal locked and true while dual tuned molded antennas with LEDs monitor the true-diversity operation. The rear panel features balanced XLR and unbalanced 1/4-inch outputs allowing flexible connection options. In addition, two CR77 receivers can be rackmounted together in a single space rack adapter available as an added accessory.

With the AirLine Wireless Guitar System, you get complete wireless freedom that's good to go anywhere the music takes you.

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Specifications

Frequencies:
E1 - 863.125 MHz
E2 - 863.625 MHz
E3 - 864.500 MHz
E4 - 864.875 MHz

•True diversity UHF wireless guitar system with PLL frequency control
•CR77 receiver features multi-segment audio level and RF level LED meters
•Squelch and volume control
•XLR and unbalanced 1/4-inch outputs with mic/line level output switch
•AF1/AG1 micro transmitter plugs directly into guitar or bass
•Transmitter features power switch, power/battery LED and 15 dB pad
•Single AAA battery operation allows up to 14 hours of life for AF1/AG1
•AC adapter and 1/4-inch to 1/4-inch cable included

 

Frequency Information

Information Resource and FAQ's - Wireless Microphone Frequency Guide

There have been many questions surrounding the 2012 digital switchover and its effect on Wireless Microphone Frequencies across the UK. To help clarify some frequently asked questions, A.C. Audio have put together a source of reference with the current plans from Ofcom.

If you have any queries about these upcoming implementations, we are on hand to discuss your individual circumstances and will be a source of unbiased advice. As a distributor for all major wireless equipment brands, we will endeavour to advise the best course of action that will ensure minimal disruption during the digital switchover.

Which frequency ranges have been affected?

Frequencies 854-862 MHz (TV channel 69) has been allocated elsewhere, making the use of radio mics and wireless systems illegal to use on this frequency.

Which frequency range is free to run wireless systems on?

Frequency band 863-865 MHz (Channel 70) is deregulated and does not require a license. If you plan on running more than four wireless systems at one time it’s recommended you use frequency band 606-614 MHz (Channel 38) which will require a license.

Are there any other possible frequency bands?

470-550 MHz (TV channels 21 to 30) and 614-790 MHz (TV channels 39 to 60) will be available for wireless microphones on a secondary use with Digital Terrestrial Television (DTT) and on a license basis (called: "interleaved spectrum: spectrum between TV transmitters that cover only regions").

The VHF band 174-216 is not yet affected by the Digital Dividend, and there is some interleaved VHF spectrum availability. There are three frequencies within the VHF that can be used license free - 173,800 MHz, 174,500 MHz and 175.000 MHz.

Because the new IMT services use an up and down link and these need to be separated to overcome interference, the band 790-862 MHz will be split in 2 parts of 30 MHz. In the middle will be a "Duplex Centre Gap" running from 821-832 MHz. There is a possibility that this gap will become available for wireless microphones in the future. However, with current technology and the noise created in this band by the IMT service, we would question its suitability for wireless microphones at this time. It is anticipated that only 3-4 MHz in the middle of the gap will be usable. This band is under investigation on European and national levels.

In the 1.8GHz band (1785-1800 MHz) Ofcom grants access for digital wireless microphones only. This frequency range is not really suited for wireless microphones, as the higher frequencies (i.e. shorter wavelengths) create more body absorption and shadow effects due to the directivity, etc. The use of these frequencies will only work adequately when there is a line of sight and a short distance between the transmitter and the receiver.

How about licenses and license fees?

The Joint Frequency Management Group (JFMG) is the UK's band manager for the Program Making and Special Events (PMSE) industry. For further licensing details please contact JFMG atwww.jfmg.co.uk.

Is it possible to modify current wireless microphones to other frequency ranges?

Yes in many instances, but this is dependant on the make and model and in some circumstances it may be more economical to purchase a new system.

Does Ofcom compensate equipment becoming redundant as a result of these plans?

Yes, some funding is available to cover the movement of equipment out of TV channel 69 towards TV channel 38. On August 14, 2009 Ofcom published a consultation document on eligibility criteria, we recommend users to read this consultationwww.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/pmse_funding/.

Where can I find more detailed information on available frequencies?

Please contact A.C. Audio for more information or alternatively the British Entertainment Industry Radio Group (BEIRG) provides a lot of information and makes a great effort to preserve the spectrum for our industry. See www.beirg.co.uk.

Find more helpful information on the JFMG website www.jfmg.co.uk and regular updates from www.ofcom.co.uk.

How do I obtain a frequency plan for an available spectrum?

 

Also JFMG can provide frequency plans: www.jfmg.co.uk/pages/freq/freq.htm.

Equipment available to buy from this site is for professional use only. Please note in certain countries some products listed may not be available from A.C. Entertainment Technologies Ltd.

E&OE. Information is subject to change without notice. The rights and ownership of all trademarks are recognised.

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